Lessons from Groupon: 3 ways to change how you think about your customers

We’ll spare you any commentary on Groupon’s business model, accounting irregularities or stock market misadventures. But it’s hardly surprising news to hear Founder and CEO Andrew Mason’s tenure has expired faster than a Groupon for a cheap haircut.

Mason refreshingly posted in his departing note to Groupon employees, “I’ve decided that I’d like to spend more time with my family. Just kidding – I was fired today.” Mason also said, “If you’re wondering why… you haven’t been paying attention.” And, giving credit where credit is due, he was frank about it all saying, “As CEO, I am accountable.”

What we liked most about Mason’s candid and honest note was his admission about customers, “If there’s one piece of wisdom that this simple pilgrim would like to impart upon you: have the courage to start with the customer. My biggest regrets are the moments that I let a lack of data override my intuition on what’s best for our customers. This leadership change gives you some breathing room to break bad habits and deliver sustainable customer happiness – don’t waste the opportunity!”

There is a lesson here for brands:

  1. Although important for understanding history and gaining perspective, data can’t predict the future. In other words, data can’t reveal what choice a customer will make. Even customers themselves don’t always know. Sometimes you just need to trust your intuition as a marketer.
  2. Talk to your customers. Know them. Go beyond data. Understand how they feel.
  3. Be real with customers. Be authentic. They will trust you more.

Now that’s a deal.

Read more about Mason’s departure from Groupon at Wired.com.

Share Knowledge

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Continue Learning

Related Resources

Simple Lessons Every CMO Can Learn from Pope Francis

Even the most complex brands get reduced to a few symbols. Sound bites have crushed 2,000 years of the Catholic Church down to pedophile priests and financial scandals. Media coverage of the selection of a new pope suggests the church’s brand is nothing more than a puff of smoke.

Nikestrong: Brand Opportunity for Nike Post-Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong’s conniving selfishness left Livestrong—his cancer-fighting charity and only redeeming legacy—in an uphill struggle for survival. We don’t expect everyone to be perfect — stuff happens. But we expect people — particularly heroes and leaders — to be authentic and honest. It’s fundamental to human social interaction. Our very survival hinges on trust in others.

Long Sleep the King

When Burger King dethroned their creepy plastic-headed mascot last summer, nary a tear was shed throughout the realm. Females cheered, moms rejoiced and marketers wondered, “What took them so long?”

Webinar

Covid-19 Original Inquiry Webinar Series Part 2: The Healthcare Experience

444 N. Michigan Avenue Suite 3100, Chicago, IL 60611